#26. Strategic Materials Across Scales (SMAS): experimental and simulation approaches for bridging length and time scales

Organizers

  • Emanuela Del Gado, Georgetown University, USA
  • Roland Pellenq, MIT/CNRS, USA (pellenq@mit.edu)
  • Farhang Radjai, CNRS, France
  • Gilles Pijaudier-Cabot, UPPA , France

Description

The goal of this symposium is to give a state-of-the-art identifying and proposing future directions of research in the field of multiscale modelling for important and strategic classes of materials such as cement, concrete, soil, wood, steel, ceramics and glasses. This coordinated initiative aims at promoting a shift of paradigm that enables progress at the interface of physics and engineering for a large variety of critical problems that are at the core of current societal, environmental and economic concerns in connection with durability and sustainability in construction, transportation, energy and waste management. The ambition of the symposium is formulating a conceptual tool named as the “nanoscope” that combines most advanced statistical physics numerical simulations (such as accelerated Molecular Dynamics) with advanced experiments (such as X-Ray/electron tomography…). This “nanoscope” tool aims at elucidating the 3D texture of those multi-scale (and most of the time porous) materials from the scale of atoms to microns, focusing in particular on mechanical and transport properties. The coupling between numerical simulation and experiments is a major theme and is one of the most challenging issues in Material Science, Mechanics and condensed matter Physics. This also encompasses instability and failure mechanisms at all scales ranging from nano and microstructure to catastrophic failures and avalanches. For this original symposium, we expect contributions on all aspects related to modeling and experimental approaches for porous materials, nanomaterials, granular materials, soft mechanics, flow and creep, confined fluids, multiscale mechanics, transport in nanopores, instabilities and hydromechanical coupling.